Skip to main content

Toronto will see its coldest daytime high of the season on Tuesday. Here is what you need to know.

Share

Toronto will see its coldest daytime high of the season on Tuesday.

The temperature in the city will reach -1 C later today and will feel like -5 C to -8 C with the windchill.

Earlier this morning, temperatures dropped to -5.6 C. While unseasonal, Tuesday is not the coldest day recorded recently as the last time temperatures dropped to -5.6C in the city was on Nov. 20.

The average high for this time of year, according to Environment Canada, is 4.3 C.

“The winds will not only make it feel cooler that the numbers might suggest. They are aligning in such a way as to bring a significant lake-effect snow for the traditional snow belts north and northwest of the city,” CP24 Meteorologist Bill Coulter said.

Some of those areas remain under snow squall warning and could see snowfall totals of 20 to 30 centimetres by tonight, Coulter said.

Winds will continue in Toronto well into the night with a risk of flurries in the city as temperatures drop to a low of -6C.

WARMING CENTRES OPEN TONIGHT

The City of Toronto will open three warming centres up amid the cold temperatures.

Those facilities are located at 75 Elizabeth Street in downtown Toronto, 15 Olive. Avenue in North York, and 885 Scarborough Golf Club Road and will open their doors at 5 p.m.

The free service for unhoused and vulnerable residents provides resting spaces, meals, access to washroom facilities, and referrals to emergency shelter.

“Individuals do not need to contact Central Intake to access a warming centre,” the city said in a news release. “Walk-ins are welcome. If someone arrives at a warming centre and it is at capacity, the City will assist with transportation to another warming centre that has space available.” 

To view a map of the city's warming centres, click here

CTVNews.ca Top Stories

Trump says his criminal indictments boosted his appeal to Black voters

Former U.S. president Donald Trump claimed Friday that his four criminal indictments have boosted his support among Black Americans because they see him as a victim of discrimination, comparing his legal jeopardy to the historic legacy of anti-Black prejudice in the U.S. legal system.

5 tips for talking to kids about their weight

It is no secret that a growing percentage of Americans can be considered overweight or obese, and that includes children. The number of kids between the ages of 2 and 19 who can be categorized as obese has now grown to 20 per cent, or one in five.

Stay Connected