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Ontario extends post-secondary tuition freeze for another year

Ontario is extending a tuition freeze for public colleges and universities for a third year. Colleges and Universities Minister Jill Dunlop says in a press release that the freeze will continue for the 2023-24 school year for Ontario students, while allowing post-secondary institutions to raise their fees for domestic, out-of-province students by up to five per cent. Dunlop makes an announcement at the legislature in Toronto, Thursday, June 25, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Steve Russell-Pool Ontario is extending a tuition freeze for public colleges and universities for a third year. Colleges and Universities Minister Jill Dunlop says in a press release that the freeze will continue for the 2023-24 school year for Ontario students, while allowing post-secondary institutions to raise their fees for domestic, out-of-province students by up to five per cent. Dunlop makes an announcement at the legislature in Toronto, Thursday, June 25, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Steve Russell-Pool
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Ontario is extending a tuition freeze for public colleges and universities for a third year.

Colleges and Universities Minister Jill Dunlop says in a press release that the freeze will continue for the 2023-24 school year for Ontario students, while allowing post-secondary institutions to raise their fees for domestic out-of-province students by up to five per cent.

Colleges Ontario says they are disappointed they aren't being given the flexibility to respond to escalating cost pressures.

The Progressive Conservative government reduced tuition fees by 10 per cent for the 2019-20 school year and has frozen rates since then.

The cut was introduced at the same time as the government cut a free tuition program for low-income students.

Dunlop also announced the creation of an expert panel to provide advice on post-secondary financial sustainability.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 2, 2023.

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