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Former TDSB trustee Parthi Kandavel wins Scarborough Southwest byelection: unofficial results

People enter a voting location on municipal election day in Toronto on Monday, October 22, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov People enter a voting location on municipal election day in Toronto on Monday, October 22, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov
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Former Toronto District School Board trustee Parthi Kandavel has won the Scarborough Southwest municipal byelection, according to unofficial results.

With all polls reporting, Kandavel received 4,641 votes. He is followed by community advocate Kevin Rupasinghe, who got 3,854 votes. In third place is Anna Sidiropoulos with 2,275 votes.

Kandavel will fill the Ward 20 seat left vacant after former councillor Gary Crawford resigned in July to run as a PC candidate in a provincial byelection in Scarborough-Guildwood.

Kandavel was elected TDSB trustee in 2014, a position he held until 2022. He ran for councillor last year and finished behind Crawford.

Some of Kandavel's priorities include building affordable housing, increasing bus frequency, securing better local services and protecting the Scarborough Bluffs.

Twenty-three people vied for the council seat.

Some 4,374 eligible voters turned out for advance voting, which was held this past Saturday and Sunday.

The city said official election results are expected to be certified by the city clerk next week.

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